Staff.com Payroll: Paying via PayPal

The PayPal integration is set up for PayPal Mass Pay. This is the lowest cost way for a business to pay people on PayPal. The cost 2% of the transfer amount PLUS PayPal will effectively charge for currency conversion at a rate of approximately 2.5% although this varies depending on the currency. The maximum fee is $20 for international payments and only $1 for US and Canadian domestic payments.

If you do not have access to PayPal Mass Pay but you still want to use PayPal then you can pay manually through your PayPal account. In this case select the payment method as Manual. The costs will be significantly higher in this case.

The steps to setting this up are:

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What is the best way to structure the setup of a remote working team?

 

What is the best way to structure the setup of a remote working team?

What are pitfalls of setting up a remote team and how can they be overcome?

If you’ve decided to hire a remote digital marketing team, where’s the best place to start?

Those were the burning questions David Bain asked our very own Liam Martin, co-founder and COO of Staff.com and Time Doctor, on episode #28 of the Digital Marketing Broadcast.

Staff.com is an online staffing site for long term jobs.

Time Doctor is a time tracking and productivity monitoring software designed for managing remote teams.

In this podcast, Liam discussed with David the the ins and outs of setting up a remote working team, reflecting on his 5 years of experience in outsourcing, designing and managing distributed ecosystems like those of Staff.com and Time Doctor.

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26 Ways Your Company Can be More Productive When Working Remotely

At Staff.com and Time Doctor all of our 52 employees work remotely (from home) in 9 different countries. I have been working completely remotely now for over 6 years. When done right, remote work can be very productive, but many companies find it hard to manage or work with people who aren’t sitting with them in an office.

Here are some tips based on my experience and our collective experience as a company on how to make it work.

1. Over-communicate (compensate for the lack of face-to-face)

Face to face meetings

People working in a office tend to bump into each other and are more likely to communicate often because they’re constantly seeing each other.

When working remotely you don’t see your co-workers, which makes it easier to forget about them, and to forget to communicate. Out of sight, out of mind. This solitude has benefits in that there are less distractions and “got a minute” meetings, but it can lead to a culture with too little communication. So you need to over communicate to compensate for the fact that you’re not naturally bumping into each other in the office.

Let’s take a look at some of the ways you can communicate more effectively when working remotely...

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Winning the Away Game: How to Get Remote Staff Onside

Being a remote worker—whether from a home office or Hong Kong—is the new normal. Since 2005, there’s been an 80% increase in the number of "telecommunicating" employees in the US. There’s no doubt we’ve become smarter about how we work and where we work from. But working remotely still feels… well, remote.

Modern organizations are armed with cloud-collaboration tools that should make working from anywhere a breeze. Combine these tools with a global talent pool from which to hire, and you're set to dominate the competition, right?

So, why do we still struggle to connect teams, keep them happy and bring them into the company family? These four effective tactics will help you create a work environment that’s both global and connected.

Find Yourself. Choose a Corporate Identity that Works

Identifying your company’s unique culture is a first step toward creating a global communication strategy that works. Don’t be overwhelmed by process. Instead, start with this fun exercise: choose a persona that embodies your company’s strengths and weaknesses. Perhaps your company is like Star Wars' Darth Maul: cutthroat, highly skilled, a source of fear and symbol of hatred throughout the galaxy. Or you might be an office of Bart Simpsons: high energy, motivated by your own ideas, but extremely impulsive.

Not only is this exercise fun, it’s a simple way to assess your company’s character, and gives you some insight and guidance into how your company communicates—internally and externally. If you’re a company of Barts, you’ll want to make sure your remote team doesn’t miss out on annual “Eat My Shorts” day. That’s right, at least send them a cake.

Bart Simpson cake Read More